Kamis, 24 Maret 2011

F22 Or Raptor Not Appear in Libya?

United States actually has a mainstay fighter called the F-22 Raptor. Supermanuver fighter aircraft with twin engines of this fifth generation fighter aircraft are planned to be superior, but also equipped with additional capabilities, such as ground attack, electronic warfare, and signal Intelligence.
The aircraft is designed to carry guided missiles (missiles) in the fuselage so that the enemy undetected. Additionally, these aircraft can also carry bombs such as Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) and Small-Diameter Bomb (SDB) and was unable to detect radar. F-22 was developed by Lockheed Martin in partnership with Boeing.

Chief of Staff Air Force Gen. Norton Schwartz, the United States in a meeting on March 17, 2011 and said that the F-22 will be used in the initial attack on Libya. However, since the attack on March 19, 2011 then, the aircraft which used only three Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit, four Eagle Boeing F-15e, and eight Lockheed Martin F-16CJ Fighting Falcon. Then, where the F-22?
Loren Thompson, analyst and chief operating officer at the Lexington Institute, said, "The F-22 designers have a dilemma, whether to choose the connectivity that allows the flexibility or the ability of radio silence that can support the ability of the aircraft as a stealth aircraft. The choice was made because of the limitations of the data network. "
Limitations of the F-22 is the inability to communicate with coalition aircraft attacked the target and the limited land. F22 only able to communicate with others via the F-22 intraflight data link. That, too, was limited to receiving, not transmitting data. Thompson said, as a stealth aircraft, the F-22 did not have the connectivity that can be found on other aircraft.
Another disadvantage is the F-22 can only use a 1,000 pound JDAM used to attack stationary targets. The aircraft produced since 1997 has also not been able to carry 250 pound SDB or create a radar map in the form of high-quality black and white images of the Earth surface is required to choose their own targets on land.
Actually, this aircraft hardware and software will be upgraded to 3.1 Increment this year. However, although the upgrade is done, the F-22 will only be able to assign two of eight SDB targets that can be brought. Upgrades will also not be able to fix to make the plane capable to connect with other aircraft.
The next upgrade, the Increment 3.2, actually planned with Multifunction Advanced Data Link (MADL), also found on the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Only by upgrading the F-22 can set eight goals for eight SDB was carrying.
Appropriate Air Force doctrine, the F-22 Raptor will be used to assist the Spirit stealth bomber B-2 in the "open door" to attack enemy air defenses. However, U.S. Africa Command that runs the Operation Dawn Odyssey in Libya confirmed that the F-22 will not fly in the attack.
Maj. Eric Hilliard, a spokesman for the command of Africa, said, "I do not see indications of the F-22 will be used to help the mission of B-2 or used for the next mission in the attack Libya." As is known, B-2 stealth bombers have been used in Operation Spirit Dawn Oddysey to cripple Libya.
In addition, another reason not to use the Raptor is a fighter fleet of air that is actually still ancient Libya. In fact, the F-22 is designed to be a machine with air superiority (air superiority) against other aircraft. Mark Gunzinger of the Center for Strategic and budgetary Analysis, Washington, said, "The Raptor is probably not necessary. Defence Libya was so powerful that it can be disabled easily."
F-22 itself is a fighter with a long development period. The prototype of this aircraft was given the name YF-22, then changed to F / A 22 and finally called the F-22. Until the year 2004, 51 F-22 has been distributed.

Source
KOMPAS.com

1 comments:

Anonim 28 Maret 2011 12.35  

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